Citrus County Dementia Friendly America Citrus County Dementia Friendly America
Call UsFind Us
  • Educate Yourself
  • Attend Workshops
  • Join a Support Group

Articles

Posted on 02 May 2018
Posted on 03 Apr 2018
Posted on 17 Oct 2017
Posted on 20 Sep 2017
Posted on 03 Jul 2017
News For Coping with Dementia
Published by Coping with Dementia LLC
Posted on 17 Mar 2017
Given the large number of small businesses in Citrus County, it is vital that owners accommodate as many people as possible, and that includes customers with dementia, according to Debbie Selsavage.
Posted on 17 Mar 2017
I am welcomed with a smile and a clip board at my doctor’s office. I smile back and accept the papers attached to the clip board with a thank you. The receptionist is new. She says, “Please look over the paperwork and make changes if necessary.” It is early in the morning and I am ready for my checkup, but that last sentence throws me for a loop.
Posted on 17 Mar 2017
In the early 19th century, practically all medical care took place in the home. In an agrarian society, the next farm house might be several miles away, and a doctor even farther than that. The idea of taking someone to a separate place — such as a hospital — for care was not practical, and by most considered not desirable.
Posted on 17 Mar 2017
Visiting with Linda Boles on her serene property in Crystal River, it’s quite easy for one to see the passion she has for her animals. Eight bloodhounds lay happily around their play area that includes access to a pool, which they frequently use to cool off. For shelter, they have a newly built 30-by-45-foot kennel, half of which has air conditioning and heat.
Posted on 17 Mar 2017
Tears roll down his face as he realizes these could be his final days. “Is this the end of my life?” Jerry Rush says. He looks out the window, then sits with his wife. Vivid memories of the war roll in. “He’s back on the ship, from World War II,” his wife Joye Rush tells a visitor. She thinks her husband is working through the emotions of war, where he was the youngest guy on the ship, just 17, a gunner at sea.
Posted on 17 Mar 2017
Having a solid community of people we can trust enough to be vulnerable with and who will sustain us through difficult times is a foundational part of life. Yet, I hear all too often that people with dementia and their caregivers feel isolated and cut off from their own community.
Posted on 17 Mar 2017
Choosing an assisted living facility can be a daunting experience unless you are prepared. Here are some tips when considering placing a parent or loved one in an ALF.
Posted on 17 Mar 2017
Memory Loss for recent or new information — repeats self frequently.
Difficulty doing familiar, but difficult tasks — managing money, medication, driving.
Posted on 17 Mar 2017
Memory Café is intended to enhance socialization for caregivers and their loved ones who have dementia. We come together once a month to share our memories, laughter and an understanding that none of us is alone. I am truly blessed to know each and every one of our members who teach me about unconditional love, patience, and understanding.
Posted on 17 Mar 2017
Caregivers living with a family member or spouse already have to cope with stress as they watch their loved one’s mental acuity slowly regress to the point where it becomes a fulltime job. There comes a time when the always-painful decision must be made: do we keep those afflicted at home or do we seek professional care.
Posted on 17 Mar 2017
Editor’s note: Below is a list of questions and answers about dementia-like symptoms and Alzheimer’s disease. Answers are based on reports from the Alzheimer’s Association, a 35-year-old global, national and local volunteer organization to lead efforts in care, research and support.
Posted on 17 Mar 2017
Movies, including their replay on television and other devices, are not just entertaining, but one of the leading learning tools in our culture. And despite the fact that Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia have become one of the leading medical challenges of our time, much ignorance and misunderstanding of these diseases remains.
Posted on 17 Mar 2017
We have spoken before in this column about the kind of environment that enables you to provide better care for someone with Alzheimer’s or dementia. You need a calm and quiet setting with low stimulation.
You need stability and predictability so you can establish and stick to a routine. You need familiarity; no
big surprises.
Posted on 17 Mar 2017
As behaviors change in the one we love with the onset of dementia, we are often tempted to look for excuses. Denial creeps up on us, and instead of addressing the problem we make changes and accommodations at home to keep the peace. Keeping life as “normal” as possible is your goal. You suspect there might be something wrong, but you keep telling yourself, “It’s not that bad,” or “This is just normal aging.”
Posted on 17 Mar 2017
Twenty-five years ago, handicapped people had a hard time getting out to stores and public places because there were no ramps, designated parking spots or specially equipped bathrooms. Today, thanks to strict Americans with Disabilities Act laws, these people can patronize stores and function in the community instead of being stuck at home.
Powered by CuteNews
Citrus County Dementia Friendly America on Facebook